NOAA Satellites To Capture Total Solar Eclipse

Image Credit: NOAA

August 16, 2017 – While most of America will be looking up on August 21 during the solar eclipse, America’s newest weather satellite, NOAA’s GOES-16, will be looking down on the earth, tracking the moon’s shadow across the United States with its highly sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager. The satellite’s imager will provide three, high-resolution, color animations and still pictures of the eclipse.

NOAA plans to issue images of the eclipse from GOES-16 and its other polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites as they become available.

Flying on NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite – in orbit one million miles away between the Earth, sun and past the moon –​ is the NASA EPIC camera. The high-powered EPIC will also take images and a movie of the moon’s shadow on Earth that likely will be available within one or two days following the eclipse.

Here’s a look at the expected times of the GOES-16 and DSCOVR visuals:

GOES-16 Animations And Still Images

  • First Animation: 11:30 a.m. MT

  • Shows the eclipse shadow emerging from the Pacific Ocean

  • Second animation: 1:30 p.m. MT

  • Shows the full-run of the eclipse shadow, moving across the continental U.S., after the shadow has left the coast of South Carolina

  • Third animation: between 2:30 – 3 p.m. MT

  • Shows the entire loop of the eclipse shadow passing across the whole Earth

    All of the GOES-16 eclipse animations and still images will be available at https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/2017Eclipse

    (Please credit GOES-16 imagery to NOAA.)

    EPIC Image And Movie

    The visible color images and movie from NASA’s EPIC camera aboard NOAA’s DSCOVR satellite will be available at https://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov

    (Please credit EPIC images to NASA/NOAA.)