CSU Distinguished Professor Emeritus Elected To National Academy Of Engineering

Dr. Graeme Stephens has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Image Credit: JPL

Dr. Graeme Stephens has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Image Credit: JPL

February 6, 2015 – Colorado State University Atmospheric Science University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Graeme Stephens has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He will be formally inducted at the NAE annual meeting in October 2015.

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to “engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,” and to the “pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.”

Dr. Graeme Stephens completed his B.S. with honors from the University of Melbourne in 1973 and received his Ph.D. in 1977 from the same university. He was appointed to the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research in 1977 as a research scientist and promoted to senior research scientist in 1982. From 1979 to 1980, Professor Stephens served as a post-doctoral research student at the CSU Department of Atmospheric Science. He joined the faculty as an associate professor in 1984, was promoted to full professor in 1991, and received Emeritus status in 2010. In 2005 he was honored as a University Distinguished Professor and is currently the Director of the Center for Climate Sciences at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he continues to work on the CloudSat Mission along with focusing on climate, it’s impact on our environment and the development of future climate missions that hold unprecedented global relevance for today’s society.

Dr. Stephens’ research activities focus on atmospheric radiation including the application of remote sensing in climate research to understand the role of hydrological processes in climate change. He also serves as the primary investigator (PI) of the NASA CloudSat Mission and associated research group which has launched a satellite to study the internals of clouds using equipment similar to radar.