Cobham Semiconductor Solution Products Contributed To CaSSIS Instrument On ExoMars 2016 Payload

Artist's impression of the ExoMars 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter with the entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, Schiaparelli, attached. Image Credit: ESA/ATG medialab

Artist’s impression of the ExoMars 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter with the entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, Schiaparelli, attached. Image Credit: ESA/ATG medialab

August 25, 2016 – Cobham’s Magnetoresistive Random-Access Memories (MRAMs), along with several other Cobham components, launched aboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), in the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) instrument on March 14, 2016. Cobham components were selected for the CaSSIS instrument due to their radiation performance and trusted reliability.

These components included the GR712RC Dual-Core LEON3FT Microprocessor from Cobham Gaisler in Sweden, 16Mb MRAM, 2.5Gb SDRAM, LVDS drivers and receivers and MIL-STD-1553 Bus Transceiver from Cobham Semiconductor Solutions in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

“Cobham Semiconductor Solutions extends our sincere thanks to the University of Bern along with our congratulations on a successful design, launch and mission,” said Michelle Mundie, Business Area Director, Standard Products. “Cobham proved to be a one stop shop for the key functions of the subject instrument.”

“Cobham Gaisler staff are proud in supporting the University of Bern team by providing the GR712RC microprocessor for CaSSIS,” said Sandi Habinc, Cobham Gaisler General Manager .

The ExoMars program is a joint endeavour between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos). The first mission of the ExoMars program is ExoMars 2016. It is scheduled to arrive at Mars in October 2016 and consists of a Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and an entry, descent and landing demonstrator module (EDM) known as Schiaparelli. The main objectives of this mission are to search for evidence of methane and other trace atmospheric gases that could be signatures of active biological or geological processes and to test key technologies in preparation for ESA’s contribution to subsequent missions to Mars.